(Source: sandandglass, via bookoisseur)

We got #rad this morning!

We got #rad this morning!

Tags: rad

"Never push a loyal person to the point where they no longer care."

L (via marcusmcfly)

100% where I am right now.

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via bookoisseur)

jtotheizzoe:

Wil Wheaton for President!

Listen to Wil Wheaton's response to a young girl who gets made fun of for being smart. It's … what do they call it? Oh yeah, THE BEST THING.

Best of all, he doesn’t just remind her that it’s not her fault if she gets made fun of (it’s the bully’s fault) or reassure her that it will get better (it will) or show her all the beautiful parts of being a nerd (they are infinite). Wil does all those things and he tells he how she can use her passion and curiosity to extend a hand of kindness to the bully, to help them find their nerd thing.

And yes, that thing is probably tetherball, because everyone loves tetherball. 

Check out the full story at WilWheaton.net. Thanks to Bradley Batt at Medium, here’s Wil’s full answer:

When I was a boy I was called a nerd all the time—because I didn’t like sports, I loved to read, I liked math and science, I thought school was really cool—and it hurt a lot. Because it’s never ok when a person makes fun of you for something you didn’t choose. You know, we don’t choose to be nerds. We can’t help it that we like these things—and we shouldn’t apologize for liking these things.

I wish that I could tell you that there is really easy way to just not care, but the truth is it hurts. But here’s the thing that you might be able to understand—as a matter of fact I’m confident you will be able to understand this because you asked this question…

When a person makes fun of you, when a person is cruel to you, it has nothing to do with you. It’s not about what you said. It’s not about what you did. It’s not about what you love. It’s about them feeling bad about themselves. They feel sad.

They don’t get positive attention from their parents. They don’t feel as smart as you. They don’t understand the things that you understand. Maybe one of their parents is pushing them to be a cheerleader or a baseball player or an engineer or something they just don’t want to do. So they take that out on you because they can’t go and be mean to the person who’s actually hurting them.

So, when a person is cruel to you like that, I know that this is hard, but honestly the kind and best reaction is to pity them. And don’t let them make you feel bad because you love a thing.

Maybe find out what they love and talk about how they love it. I bet you find out that a person who loves tetherball, loves tetherball in exactly the same way that you love Dr. Who, but you just love different things.

And I will tell you this — it absolutely gets better as you get older.

I know it’s really hard in school when you’re surrounded by the same 400 people a day that pick on you and make you feel bad about yourself. But there’s 50,000 people here this weekend who went through the exact same thing—and we’re all doing really well.

So don’t you ever let a person make you feel bad because you love something they decided is only for nerds. You’re loving a thing that’s for you.

I showed this to my 5 year old because he gets picked on for liking school and math. In kindergarten he is teased and bullied. He watched and said “that’s just like me.” I’ve had the same conversations with him but it seemed to mean more coming from an outside source. Thank you wilwheaton
"We didn’t give women the right to vote (in the U.S.) until 1920. …That means American Democracy is 94 years old. There are three people in my building older than American democracy. Women have had a rough time. It was so okay to beat your wife until so recently, that today we have a kind of shirt named after it. There’s a piece of clothing in our culture affectionately nicknamed after beating the crap out of your wife, and for some reason this is offensive to nobody."

— Louis CK monologue (via sonnyjohnson)

(via bookoisseur)

"Love for your parents should not be automatic, it must be earned by the parents’ performance"

— George Carlin (via dougieplaysbanjo)

(via bookoisseur)

(Source: odnson, via megsokay)

mbelibrary:

Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973) was the first of seven children born to John Rankin and Olive Pickering, in Missoula, MT.
Rankin attended the University of Montana in Missoula, and graduated with a degree in biology. Afterward she became a teacher in rural Montana.
Seeking more from life, she moved to Boston in 1904 and stayed with her brother, who was attending Harvard University. The poverty that existed in Boston had a great impact on Rankin, as did the poverty she saw on a trip to San Francisco in 1907. As a result, she pursued a degree in social work from the New York School of Philanthropy in 1908.
As a social worker, Rankin joined the Children’s Home Society in Washington, but, discovering that she did not enjoy institutional work, she went on to study social legislation at the University of Washington. There she became involved in the women’s suffrage movement. As a representative from the Montana Equal Franchise Society, she became the first woman to speak before the all-male Montana legislature. Her work at the Society led her to participate in the New York Women’s Suffrage Party and the National American Woman Suffrage Association. 
Rankin became the first female member of the U.S. Congress, when she was elected to the House of Representatives in 1916. Her win gained national attention, and she naturally drew interest. She was vivacious and attractive, breaking the stereotype of the suffragette as old and scrupulous. She devoted herself to women’s issues. In 1917 she voted voting against U.S. participation in World War I, and later adopted a platform of pacifism. She lost her seat in the 1918 election, and then devoted her focus to the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom and the National Consumer’s League. In 1928 she and Lucy Stanton established the Georgia Peace Society.
During the conflict leading up to World War II, Rankin ran for Congress again and won. On Dec. 8, 1941, Speaker Sam Rayburn refused to let Rankin speak against U.S. involvement World War II, and she was ridiculed for casting the sole congressional vote against the declaration of war on Japan. Her actions resulted in the loss of her electoral career. 
After Rankin’s term expired, she traveled the world. She adopted Mohandas Ghandi’s approach to nonviolent resistance and remained active. At 88 she led the Jeannette Rankin Brigade on an anti-Vietnam War march in Washington, D.C. In 1972 Rankin was named the first member of the Susan B. Anthony Hall of Fame.
Source: "Jeannette Pickering Rankin." Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1994. Biography in Context. Web. 5 Mar. 2014.
Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, George Grantham Bain Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, LC-DIG-ggbain-23835

mbelibrary:

Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973) was the first of seven children born to John Rankin and Olive Pickering, in Missoula, MT.

Rankin attended the University of Montana in Missoula, and graduated with a degree in biology. Afterward she became a teacher in rural Montana.

Seeking more from life, she moved to Boston in 1904 and stayed with her brother, who was attending Harvard University. The poverty that existed in Boston had a great impact on Rankin, as did the poverty she saw on a trip to San Francisco in 1907. As a result, she pursued a degree in social work from the New York School of Philanthropy in 1908.

As a social worker, Rankin joined the Children’s Home Society in Washington, but, discovering that she did not enjoy institutional work, she went on to study social legislation at the University of Washington. There she became involved in the women’s suffrage movement. As a representative from the Montana Equal Franchise Society, she became the first woman to speak before the all-male Montana legislature. Her work at the Society led her to participate in the New York Women’s Suffrage Party and the National American Woman Suffrage Association. 

Rankin became the first female member of the U.S. Congress, when she was elected to the House of Representatives in 1916. Her win gained national attention, and she naturally drew interest. She was vivacious and attractive, breaking the stereotype of the suffragette as old and scrupulous. She devoted herself to women’s issues. In 1917 she voted voting against U.S. participation in World War I, and later adopted a platform of pacifism. She lost her seat in the 1918 election, and then devoted her focus to the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom and the National Consumer’s League. In 1928 she and Lucy Stanton established the Georgia Peace Society.

During the conflict leading up to World War II, Rankin ran for Congress again and won. On Dec. 8, 1941, Speaker Sam Rayburn refused to let Rankin speak against U.S. involvement World War II, and she was ridiculed for casting the sole congressional vote against the declaration of war on Japan. Her actions resulted in the loss of her electoral career. 

After Rankin’s term expired, she traveled the world. She adopted Mohandas Ghandi’s approach to nonviolent resistance and remained active. At 88 she led the Jeannette Rankin Brigade on an anti-Vietnam War march in Washington, D.C. In 1972 Rankin was named the first member of the Susan B. Anthony Hall of Fame.

Source: "Jeannette Pickering Rankin." Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1994. Biography in Context. Web. 5 Mar. 2014.

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, George Grantham Bain Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, LC-DIG-ggbain-23835

(via spinsteraunt)

dianaspot:

(x)

Absolutely spot on!

(Source: idontcareimjustinspired, via bookoisseur)

policymic:

7 damaging lies we teach boys about being a man

Many of the conventional lessons we teach our boys about being men are based on traditional wisdom that encourages young men to embrace violent behavior and stifle emotions. Boys that act outside of the masculinity box we’ve constructed for them — by expressing fear or insecurity, by eating vegan, by drinking juice instead of beer, by pursuing stereotypically “feminine” interests — are told to “be a man.” This narrowed range of acceptable actions, behaviors and interests can make our boys more prone to practicing violence against women, to developing unhealthy habits like binge-drinking and to having emotional issues later in life, among other problems.

Read the full detailed listFollow policymic

(via bookoisseur)

I have witnessed first hand the corruption of corporate sponsored academic research and the professors they employ. People wonder why college doesn’t mean what it used to and that is because schools have stopped teaching the how of learning and research and only the paid for facts that are to be memorized and regurgitated. We no longer help create citizens and members of society when professors are nothing more than corporate mouthpieces cloaked in academic robes.

"American conservatism is still, after all these years, largely driven by claims that liberals are taking away your hard-earned money and giving it to Those People."

PAUL KRUGMAN, writing in today’s New York Times, "That Old-Time Whistle."

The absolute truth in 27 words.

(via inothernews)

(via fuckyeahpaulkrugman)

"Women and men alike in our culture spend very little time encouraging males to learn to love. Even the women who are pissed off at men, women most of whom are not and maybe never will be feminist, use their anger to avoid being truly committed to helping to create a world where males of all ages can know love. And there remains a small strain of feminist thinkers who feel strongly that they have given all they want to give to men; they are concerned solely with improving the collective welfare of women. Yet life has shown me that any time a single male dares to transgress patriarchal boundaries in order to love, the lives of women, men and children are fundamentally changed for the better."

— bell hooks, The Will To Change (via bookoisseur)

(Source: misandry-mermaid, via bookoisseur)

joost5:

sparklevomit:

Kids in The Hall photo-shoot from 1985

They barely look old enough to drink… in Canada..

The sign of a good comedian is when you can’t help but smile looking at any picture of them ever.

(Source: thebigbonus-or-theshaft, via spinsteraunt)